Silverware and orange napkins at a formal table setting for a festive meal.

Menu planning for special occasions

In the Jewish tradition, festivals and food (or lack thereof) go hand in hand. Sometimes it's not that easy to remember which dish goes with what holiday or festival, so we've set out to make the menu planning process a little bit easier.

Check out the following suggested menus from our recipe collection. They're well suited for certain Jewish festivals, and they're also simple, healthy and super tasty.  

Rosh Hashanah 

With its focus on sweetness and new beginnings, a traditional Rosh Hashanah menu might include the following dishes. 

Starter: 

Baked gefilte fish

Main:

Gedempte flaish (beef pot roast)

Side dish: 

Beef and sweet potato tzimmes

Desserts: 

Honey cake

Honey cookies

Succot

A festival that celebrates the harvest, Succot includes foods that could be enjoyed in the Succah—or even out under the stars. A typical menu might include fruits and vegetables that would be available during this time of year.

Starter:

Fish balls

Main dishes:

Beef cabbage rolls

Chicken knishes

Side dish:

Mushroom piroshki

Dessert:

Apple cake

Chanukah

With an emphasis on oil, it's tricky to find healthier versions of traditional foodie favourites that are eaten during this time of year. However, we have come up with some fun and festive dishes to try along with our lighter latkes and doughnuts.

Starter:

Potato latkes

Main:

Beef cholent

Sides:

Sweet and sour red cabbage

Noodle kugel

Dessert:

Baked apple cinnamon doughnuts

Mandelbrot

Purim

As a celebration associated with eating, drinking and being merry, this meal will include dishes that have secret fillings inside—all washed down with plenty of wine!

Starter:

Mushroom barley soup

Mains:

Dairy cabbage rolls

Baked fish and vegetables

Sides:

Cheese kreplach

Potato knishes

Desserts:

Poppy seed hamentaschen

Prune hamentaschen

Passover

Of all the Jewish festivals, Passover is probably one of the most food-centric. Matzo is used as an alternative to wheat flour and grains, but with a delicious result.

Starters:

Egg and onion

Chicken soup

Knaidlach

Gefilte fish

Mains:

Pot roasted chicken

Baked chicken

Sides:

Potato kugel

Honeyed carrots

Dessert:

Macaroons

Shavuot

The menu planning for Shavuot is fairly simple: dairy, dairy and more dairy! 

Starters:

Dairy potato soup

Cheese knishes

Mains:

Cheese blintzes

Cheese piroshki

Side:

Kasha varnitchkes

Dessert:

Coffee cake

Sponge cake

Listen to this page: